ubuntu features and vista ...ubuntu is the best!

Jose Michael

Features

OpenOffice - A complete productivity suite

Word Processor has everything you would expect from a modern, fully equipped word processor or desktop publisher. It's simple enough for a quick memo, powerful enough to create complete books with contents, diagrams, indexes, etc. You're free to concentrate on your message - while Word Processor makes it look great. The Wizards feature takes all the hassle out of producing standard documents such as letters, faxes, agendas, minutes, or carrying out more complex tasks such as mail merges.

Spreadsheet is the programme you've always wanted. Newcomers find it intuitive and easy to learn; professional data miners and number crunchers will appreciate the comprehensive range of advanced functions. Of course, you are free to use your old Microsoft Excel spreadsheets, or save your work in Excel format for sending to people who still use Microsoft products. If all they want to see is your results, then use Portable Document Format (.pdf) - no need to buy any extra software.

Presentation is an outstanding tool for creating effective multimedia presentations. Your presentations will stand out with 2D and 3D clip art, special effects, animation, and high-impact drawing tools. A complete range of views are supported: Drawing / Outline / Slides / Notes / Handouts to meet all the needs of presenters and audiences, plus an optional multi-pane view to put all the tools at your fingertips.

Integrated email and calendaring

Whether you need to simply check your email, create a calendar or search for a contact, Evolution can help you.

See your email the way you want it. Search Folders let you save intelligent searches which can display groups of email according to your specified criteria. Create Search Folders to combine mail from different mail accounts into a single view, quickly view all mail from your boss (or a particular friend).

Easy note-taking with Tomboy

Tomboy is a desktop note-taking application. It is simple and easy-to-use, but with potential to help you organise the ideas and information you deal with every day. Tomboy relates notes and ideas together. Using a wiki-like linking system, organising ideas is as simple as typing a name.

Safe, easy and tabbed web browsing

Firefox is a powerful, award-winning and standards compliant web browser. With tabbed browsing you'll be able to use one window to view all your web pages.

With Firefox you get inline spell check support in web forms, restore session that crashed, built in phishing detectors, better support for previewing and subscribing to web feeds, enhanced search engine management with built in OpenSearch support, and much more.

Easy editing and uploading of photos

F-spot enables you to import your photos from your hard drive, camera (including PTP type), or iPod, and supports 16 common files types, including JPEG, GIF, TIFF, RAW. Your photos can be tagged for searching and grouping. Other features include fullscreen and slideshow modes.

Editing photos in F-Spot is a breeze. Easily rotate, crop, resize, and adjust red eye and other colour settings with a few simple clicks, and versioning ensures your originals are never altered. You can also enter descriptions of photos that are saved in the actual file so other people and programmes will be able to see them, whether they use F-Spot or not.

Music and videos

Rhythmbox media player has a number of features that let you easily store, search and browse your music library and listen to internet radio. You can also view films, or videos, using Totem which features a play list, a full-screen mode, seek and volume controls and keyboard navigation.

You can download Ubuntu, or request a free CD from Canonical.

System Requirements

Ubuntu is available for PC, 64-Bit and Mac architectures. The Alternate installation CDs require at least 256 MB of RAM (the standard installation CD requires 384MB of RAM). Install requires at least 3 GB of disk space.


Now that I’ve had Ubuntu installed for a few days, it appears both more powerful and easier to use than Windows. Seriously.

Some thoughts/features.

Installing it as a dual-boot with XP was easy, as was adding the printer that was attached to another computer on the Windows net. Both tasks were easier in Ubuntu than in Windows.

Ubuntu montitors what you have installed, and with a couple of clicks you can install all updates. It does this for every program you’ve installed, unlike Windows Update, which only does it for a subset of Microsoft products.

It also has a program that catalogs and can install the literally thousands of programs available. You can deinstall them there too. There’s a huge amount of open source software available.

Ubuntu installs with a CD player/burner, FireFox, GIMP (a powerful graphics program) OpenOffice (a replacement for Microsoft Office), and an Instant Message platform that works with AOL, Yahoo, MSN and others. There’s lots more useful installed software too.

The CD burner/player popped up the title of the audio cd and a list of the song titles. Uncheck the ones you don’t want to hear, a feature I’ve not seen on the three Windows CD players I use.

I’m a web developer, and frequently need to optimize and tweak digital camera photos before putting them on the web. Fifteen minutes with GIMP, and I was resizing, cropping, tweaking the color, and most importantly, saving as JPG to a smaller, optimized for the web size. On my Windows PCs I use either FireWorks or Photoshop Elements to do this, and so far, there’s little they can do that GIMP can’t.

OpenOffice read and writes Word and Excel docs, and experienced users of Microsoft Office who have used OpenOffice say they are impressed with it.

Yes, the IM program works with all major platforms, as well as several smaller ones too.

Everything in Linux (of which Ubuntu is a variant) is a file. This actually makes things easier to access, once you get used to it. There’s also a real command line interface called terminal, where you can get stuff done fast. The Windows command line continues to get dumbed-down, which seems a shame. The command line is not for everyone and you don’t have to use it that much in Ubuntu. But it’s there - and powerful.

Most Linux variants have a superuser login that gives you control of everything. Ubuntu does this indirectly. When using superuser commands, it will ask for the password of the main user, grant those rights for that command or a certain period of time, then revoke them. Since Ubuntu aims at being for “human beings”, this is a good idea as it protects the system a bit. No doubt grizzled Linux geeks think it’s silly (and probably know a way around it anyway!)

While you probably don’t need them, and most don’t use them, there are firewall and anti-virus programs. The smaller installed base of Linux and the inherent better security of the operating system means spyware and virus beasties barely exist, if at all. (If you run a server app, then use FireStarter, the firewall.)

All the programs mentioned, including Ubuntu, are open source and free. There’s no need to spend hundreds, or even thousands, to buy programs for Windows when you can do the same, or even better, for free on Ubuntu. But it’s not just the money,it’s the philosophy, the idea of people creating software for people, without getting bogged down in proprietary platforms that lock you in.

Categories: Ubuntu



Ubuntu, as Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman will tell you, hasn't done much to date with improving the Linux kernel. On the other hand, as Canonical CEO and top Ubuntu guy Mark Shuttleworth pointed out in a recent press conference, "Ubuntu's focus has been on high-quality integration." Based on my work with the Ubuntu 8.10 release candidate, which goes final tomorrow, October 30th 2008, I agree with Shuttleworth.

I've been running Ubuntu 8.10, aka "Intrepid Ibex," on a Gateway GT5622. This PC uses a 1.80GHz Intel Pentium Dual-Core E2160 processor. It has 3GB of RAM, a 400GB SATA II hard drive and a DVD R/W drive. For graphics, it uses the Intel GMA (Graphics Media Accelerator) 950, which was set to pull 224MB of RAM from main memory to use as shared video memory.

I also ran the new Ubuntu on a Lenovo R61 ThinkPad with a 2.2GHz Intel Core 2 Duo processor, the T7500, 2GBs of RAM, with an AT&T USBConnect Quicksilver for 3G connectivity.

On these PCs, Ubuntu 8.10 ran without any hiccups, so I could focus on the features.

Number one on my list is the new Ubuntu's support for 3G wireless devices and its improved Wi-Fi support. Until Mobile WiMax becomes as universal as cellular I expect I'll find myself needing a high-speed network with no alternative except 3G.

I'm not crazy about 3G because of the cost, but when you need a connection, you need a connection and 3G is often your only choice. 3G, because Linux treats most 3G devices, such as my AT&T Quicksilver USB modems, as generic serial devices that use standard Linux PPP (Point to Point Protocol) is easy to use... if you know exactly what you're doing. As an old hand at Linux and PPP that's not a problem for me, but it is an annoyance. Now, thanks in large part to Ubuntu's incorporation of GNOME's Network Manager 0.7 you and I can both use 3G hook-ups just as if they were ordinary network connections. This makes wireless life so much easier.

Network Manager also does a much better job of handling static IP addresses and multiple network connections. For me, at least, I'd upgrade my Ubuntu systems to 8.10 for its improved network abilities alone.

Next up, while not a GNOME desktop fan, I do like the latest Ubuntu's combination of GNOME 2.24 desktop and the X.Org 7.4 windows manager. They provide a smooth ride and I especially liked Nautilus, the GNOME file manager's tab support.

I was not, however, as happy with Kubuntu, Ubuntu's KDE brother, 8.04's use of the KDE 4.1.2 desktop. I keep trying to wrap my mind around the KDE 4.x desktop, and I continue to find KDE 4.x it more annoying than useful. Here, I think openSUSE, which continues to offer KDE 3.5.10 as a pre-set alternative to KDE 4.x in its forthcoming openSUSE 11.1, has the better plan.

Number three for me is Ubuntu's use of the latest stable Linux kernel: Linux 2.6.27. It's just a solid kernel that adds some really nice features, such as vastly improved Webcam support. There was a problem between 2.6.27 and the Intel e1000e Gigabit Ethernet firmware, but that has been fixed.

Fourth on my list, although it may not appear on many other people's list of top features, is Ubuntu's including Dell's DKMS (Dynamic Kernel Module Support). DKMS makes it much easier for device vendors to get improved or new device drivers into Linux without waiting around for a new Linux kernel. For you and me, sitting at our desktops, this means that we can expect better and faster support for our existing devices and any new ones that we may add to our PCs.

Finally, I'm pleased to see Samba 3.2.3 in Ubuntu. This version of Samba takes another step in getting Linux desktops to work and play well with Microsoft Active Directory-based networks. Since I see this as one of the major remaining barriers to big business acceptance of the Linux desktop, anything that makes the Linux desktop more acceptable to Windows-centric CIOs and IT managers is a win in my book.

There are many other features-encrypted private directories for real privacy, sandboxed guest logins so you can loan your laptop out to a buddy for a quick e-mail check without worrying that they'll mess up your computer-but for me these five, with the networking improvements at the top of the list, are the best of the best. The final version of Ubuntu 8.10 will be available for download tomorrow. Get your computer and network connections ready. You're soon going to be running a great new Linux distribution.

Ubuntu VS Microsoft Windows Vista Introduction:

So you are getting a new computer. Well, your being on this page shows that you are wondering which will be the best operating system for your new computer. We present you with quick reference comparisons between different Operating Systems. All you need to do is consider your requirements and then read the comparison we offer on this page between Ubuntu and Windows Vista. Ubuntu is an open source operating system, meaning it is available for free download. Vista is a licensed operating system, meaning you need to pay to use it. Read on for the most comprehensive comparison between two of the commonest operating systems being used in Laptops and Desktops today – Ubuntu and Vista. You can find comparisons of other OS on the left side menu.

Feature

Ubuntu VS Vista

Company

Ubuntu

Microsoft

Logo

Platforms

Ubuntu – Desktop/Laptop Edition

Ubuntu – Server Edition

Vista Home Basic

Vista Home Premium

Vista Business

Vista Ultimate

ITComparison Team Comments

-:Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu installation is easier and faster. There are Free upgrades available every 6 months. It is an open source operating system, free to download and install.

Ubuntu has a great and unique option of “Live CD” installation on any other operating system. Just boot the computer with the Ubuntu CD and you can use Ubuntu without actually installing it on the computer.

Vista:

Product available in four versions each with its own specific features which can be confusing for a first time user

Vista takes longer to install with many updates required before installation is completed. There are paid upgrades from one version to another. Each version has own specific features which can be confusing for a beginner.

Looks & Apperance

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Very Slick clean look. The way its drop menu organized by categories rather than by vendor make life lot easier to find what you need.

Vista:

Vista appearance is as good as Ubuntu and it has quite few widgets for the desktop like the weather widget, sticky-notes, and a clock. We were not so happy with how software are categorized though as it made it a bit harder to find.

Virtual Desktops

Yes

No
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu has upto 36 virtual desktops (called workspaces) each of which can be individually named by you according to the applications/documents you place in them. This helps you declutter your desktop and help you navigate better. It is a great multitasking tool. Click here to heck it out Ubuntu Virtual Desktops Image

Vista:

Not applicable

Parralization Yes No
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu now can offer the ability to run windows applications as being at home. Check The image below. The procedure is explained at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/SeamlessVirtualization. It might not be the easiest to setup, but hey it work great.

Vista:

Vista still lagging on this. No similar feature is offered.

Touch screen

Yes

Yes

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Requires third party software

Vista:

Navigation Use is integrated

Built-in Security

Anti-Virus

Firewall

Networking -

Wired / Wireless

Anti-Spyware

Protect Root Access

No

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

It is one of the safest operating systems around as no ports are open by default which is one of the main hacking breaches other operating systems suffer.

Ubuntu is not only hack-proof, there are no recorded spyware infections. It is a very secure operating system. Its FireStarter firewall by default blocks all sites not listed safe by you.

Ubuntu by default does not offer access to the root directories to be modified, unlike VISTA, making Ubuntu safer and more stable as an operating system.

Vista:

Shares require password protection to be enabled (not enabled by default), a great hole most newbie's fall in and make their data available to every one not just hackers. When a data share is setup then your laptop/PC is hooked up directly to the internet without enabling the password protection (b/c you don't know or forgot to) your data will be open to the whole world. A small scan on your ISP Range will show you how many of these Vista users are there with the shares open to the public enjoy the surf :).

Some shares are enabled by default!!!

Vista suffers more security loopholes and hacking breach than Ubuntu, running out of the box. Comes with Windows Defender for internet security (almost useless). A third party security program is essential.

Backup Konserve

Backup & Restore Center.

Previous Version.

Shadow Copy.

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Directory to Directory Backup is available in Ubuntu. The backup can be stored in a variety of Media including FTP.

Vista:

Vista has a similar backup but without the ease and efficiency.

Programs Inbuilt

Evolution

Pidgin Instant Messenger

Firefox

Tomboy

F-Spot

Open Office Suite

Windows Mail

Messenger

IE 7 browser

Calendar

Photo Gallery

Movie Maker

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

More than 16,000 different packages are available for free which is mind blowing.

Firefox is the default web browser. It is a faster and more secure browser than Vista’s Internet Explorer 7.

Tomboy is a reminder plugin that you get as a helpful deskbar, giving you quick access to programs.

Open Office comes inbuilt for free. You do not have to pay anything extra to create documents, spreadsheets or presentations.

Vista:

Number of applications & features vary depending on the Vista versions.

MS Office suite is not free but has to be purchased separately and installed.

No Free software library is available for Vista, which give an edge advantage for Ubuntu. As Ubuntu has put a huge collection of software right at a click all you have to do is open you Synaptic Package, where in Vista you will have to search all over the web for your desired software, which most of them is commercial and at a higher cost.

Command Line Linux Command Line Dos Command prompt. Not much to offer.
ITComparison Team Comments Vista Command Prompt is not even comparable to Ubuntu Shell. Ubuntu Shell is very powerfull and give you the ability to perform all of your tasks easily without the need for GUI. Windows Command prompt is very limiting. That give Ubuntu a better edge in automating tasks than Vista.

Business Tools

Apache2 Web Server

PHP5 Scripting Language

Squid – Proxy Server

MySQL

FTP Server

SAMBA

Streamtuner

Open Office Write

Open Office Math

Open Office Draw

Remote Desktop

Windows Live Meetings

Windows Live Messenger

IIS

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Server Installation offers a great many features for a free OS. Streamtuner is a stream directory browser. Ubuntu has a more comprehensive business package which includes Open Office. What's even better its mostly for free!!!!

Vista:

Integrated web server is IIS, which suffers from many security & performance holes. You can always install the lovely Apache if you want. Vista does not come with any inbuilt or out-of-the box preloaded Office suite package. You will need to install one, usually after paying for it. It is a great disappointment to know that Vista offers only ancient WordPad and NotePad as text editors. More disappointing most of business applications which equivalent to what Ubuntu is offering for free will cost an arm and leg.

Auto Updates Yes Yes
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu is capable of downloading and installing updates automatically without being attended to.

Vista:

Registration is required. Popup gives options about downloading available updates.

Technical Support Yes Yes
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Both Ubuntu and Vista come with required Technical Support.

Hardware Performance Tools

No Yes
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu gives lesser trouble with 64Bit configuration. Hardware performance tools are unnecessary with Ubuntu as it is a very stable OS.

Vista:

Inbuilt hardware assessment tool for hardware optimization. Crashes are common.

Computer Accessories Sharing

Yes Yes
ITComparison Team Comments Ubuntu & Vista offers Sharing of computer accessories like printers & Flash Drives.

Bluetooth Capability

Yes

Yes
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Rarely takes long time to configure bluetooth.

Vista:

Sometimes will not configure properly to the bluetooth even when compatible, and less secure.

Disk Analyzer

Yes Yes
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Baobab is a tool that can be used to know how your disk space is being used

Vista:

Traditional Disk Analyzing tools like Scandisk, Disk Defragmenter, both of which are lower in performance than Baobab.

Gaming Network Support Yes Yes
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Most Windows based games can be run using emulator, in the addition of Linux Based games.

Some of the Gaming Networks supported are Quake4, Unreal Tournament 2004, Doom 3

Vista:

Xbox Live is the gaming network supported.

Media

Sound Juicer

(Rip audio from CD)

Rhythmbox

(Music Organizer)

Serpentine

(Allows authoring Audio CDs, Also plays your movies and help in sound recording)

Totem is the official movie player for the GNOME Desktop

Windows Media Player
ITComparison Team Comments

Ubuntu:

Programs are divided into different and specific categories like” Audio Rippper”, “Music Organizer” and “Media Player”. A wider variety for free players is included.

Vista:

One combined media player is offered by Vista.

Flexibility on Desktop Choice

Yes

No
ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu offers many desktop environment, which allow you to choose the one best fit your need. Few examples:

Your can run WindowMaker of Fluxbox for maximum performance

KDE or Gnome is there for configurability and features.

Vista:

Vista interface is AERO and only AERO. You don't have a choice, so if your machine is not a high end one then Vista maybe not the right choice for you.

System Requirements

Processor

300 MHz 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor

1 GHz 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor

RAM

At least 64 MB

Vista Basic - 512MB

Home Premium / Business / Ultimate - 1GB

Disk Space

At least 2 GB

Vista Basic - 20 GB hard drive with at least 15 GB of available space

Home Premium / Business / Ultimate - 40 GB hard drive with at least 15 GB of available space

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu can be used on almost any specification computer. Lower specification (older) computers can use different versions of desktop Ubuntu – Kubuntu can run even with 64 MB RAM, Xubuntu can run on even 48 MB RAM. Recommended RAM is 192 MB for optimal performance of any Ubuntu. Even a 300 MHz processor can support Ubuntu. You just need to use Alternate Installation CD of Ubuntu.

You do not need a high-end, latest specifications computer to run Ubuntu, which proves once more that it is really an Open Source Operating System in the real sense of the words. Any one with any system can use Ubuntu for free.

Vista:

All Vista versions including: Vista Basic, the Home Premium / Business / Ultimate need a higher amount of System requirements

Performance On equivalent hardware + Stability

High

Lower

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu is one of the most stable operating systems available today, even when compared to paid OS.

Ubuntu load much quicker than Vista. Ubuntu was able to load up fully in 45 seconds comparing to 2 minutes for Vista on the same box: ( Intel Core 2 Duo 1.2 Ghz, 1GB RAM).

Vista:

Vista is a resources HOG and will not operate well with less than 2 GB of RAM. It can have few crashes every now and then, which is common with Windows. There was some improvement after many patches being released.

Vista has a bad tendency to crash when using standard applications like notepad++, and when try to open java pages with IE7 before installing Java on your machine.

When Vista hang up then you will require a reboot, which is not required for Ubuntu thanks for the ability to restart X using "X restart"

Vista waste a lot of resources on its 3rd interface, that make application load way slower than they used to on XP. In turn Ubuntu with all its 3rd effects does not sacrifice as much resources..

Intended Users if you a good computer skill, if you don't own a brand new PC which is faster than Intel Core2Duo, or if you require an operating system which just work then Ubuntu is for you If you are new to computers, or only familiar with XP and had no time to learn a new OS. In addition you have the budget for a high end PC then Vista might be for you.
Pricing

Free

Vista Price starts from US$150 at amazon.com

ITComparison Team Comments

-: Ubuntu vs MS Windows Vista :-

Ubuntu:

Ubuntu is absolutely Free. There are no licensing, update, upgrade, or sharing fees.

Vista:

Price varies depending on the Vista Version, and its not cheap.

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